Put down the tinsel for a moment

SHARE

With the Christmas holiday period fast approaching, we tend to get drawn into the whirlpool of planning family gatherings, school break-ups, shopping and overloading our fridges beyond their intended capacity.

Worrying whether we should have ham or chicken and will grandma be all right sleeping on a camp stretcher in the spare room removes us from some of the real issues around this period.

The holiday season can be a difficult time for some families and individuals.

Financial, familial stress, loneliness and isolation are often exacerbated at this time of the year, as people come to terms with the holidays and all that goes with it.

Christmas is a time for families and a time for giving, but it’s an opportunity to think about our wider community whanau and their needs.

It’s about giving just a fraction of your time in this frantic time to others. Reaching out to people who live on their own, or neighbours you don’t see often helps to break down the isolation others may feel at Christmas.

I encourage everyone on the Otago Peninsula to put down the tinsel and the lights for a moment and think about the people around you and how Christmas may look to them.

The recent eruption of White Island/Whakaari and the death and injuries to the cruise ship passengers and their guides was a terrible tragedy.

The violence and suddenness of the eruption took the country by surprise and it’s hard not to feel great sympathy for everyone involved.

A great deal of credit goes to the many people who have been brave and tireless in the care and welfare of the dead and injured.

The cruise ship industry has become an economic staple of the Dunedin economy, with thousands of tourists visiting our city and the Otago Peninsula every year.

How we care for tourists and keep them safe while they’re in our city, on our roads and visiting our attractions is something we must be very mindful of.

It also brings up the continual quest by communities to ensure that we have the infrastructure and services to cope with the impacts of tourism.

It’s a particularly pertinent time to consider those matters as we approach the hospital rebuild and 2020’s Dunedin City Council annual plan.

Finally, to all of the community, I wish you a safe and happy holiday period.

Be good to one another, enjoy each other’s company and come back in 2020 refreshed and ready for the new year’s challenges.